David K. Johnson, Associate Professor

The Lavender Scare: Washington's Deviant Bureaucrats
Wednesday, October 25, 2017 4:00pm
Intercultural Center (UCEN)

David K. Johnson (Ph.D. Northwestern) is an Associate Professor in the history department at the University of South Florida. His first book, The Lavender Scare: The Cold War Persecution of Gays and Lesbians in the Federal Government, (University of Chricago, 2004) won three awards, including the Herbert Hoover Book Award and the Randy Shilts Award for Gay Nonfiction. A documentary film version of The Lavender Scare by Emmy-award winning director Josh Howard is currently on the film festival circuit. Johnson co-edited The U.S. Since 1945: A Documentary Reader (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009), an anthology of primary source documents for students studying modern American politics and culture. He was a contributing author to the National Park Service's LGBTQ America: A Theme Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer History. Johnson has held fellowships at the National Humanities Center, the Smithsonian Institution, the Social Science Research Council, CUNY's Center for Gay and Lesbian Studies, and the Leather Archives and Museum. He is currently cokmpleting the book "Buying Gay: Physique Magazines, Censorship, and the Rise of the Gay Movement," whichchronicles the rise of a gay commercial network in the 1950s and 1960s.

James Smither

Bridging the Gap: Using Oral History to Tell Veteran's Stories

November 8, 2017 4:30pm
251 FH- ROOM CHANGE

Military veterans, both old and new, often want to share or record their stories, but are not sure how to go about it, and friends, family and others in the community often want to learn about those stories, but do not know what to ask. The gap between soldier and civilian is substantial, and can never be fully bridged, but properly conducted oral history interviews go a long way toward giving a proper voice to individual veterans and presenting their stories in a way that a broader audience understands. Dr. James Smither, Director of the Grand Valley State University Veterans History Project, will discuss some of the ins and outs of recording and archiving interviews with veterans, as well as the value of the interviews to the veterans and their families, to researchers and the public at large.

Phil Portluck

F Street: The Place Beyond the Ridge
Monday, January 22, 2018 4:00pm
Michigan Room A

Join photographer, writer, film documentary producer, soical justice activist and native Washingtonian, for a screening and conversation of F Street: The Place beyond the Ridge. This video portrait of downtown D.C.'s historic Main Street looks at the history of F Street, NW, from Third to 15th Street. The filmmaker examines how F Street has held its own for nearly 200 years as the tide of commerce has ebbed and flowed, often leaving in its wake empty streets and vacant buildings. In addition to historic views, the filmmaker photographed a year in the life of F Street from 1980 to 1981.